10 Miles

Beginners– Training for a 10 Mile Run (3 month Programme)*

 

*To train for a 10 mile run you should already be able to run for 3 miles (5km) in 40 minutes or less without stopping, and can therefore use the following 3 month programme to build up to 10 miles.

If you cannot yet run for 3 miles continuously, or can only do so at very slow speeds (14 minute miles or slower), we recommend using our 5kms beginners training programme first, and then continuing with our 10kms beginners training programme. In such a case you should allow at least 6 months to train for a 10 mile race.

The Programme

Week 1: Tuesday: Run for 30 mins. Repeat this once more in the week with rest days in between each day of training.

On Sunday go for a 2 mile continuous run and make a note of your time at the end. Divided by 2 this will give you your average speed per mile. This will be a useful tool to measure your progress and improvement over the next few months.

Week 2: Tuesday: Run for 40 mins. Repeat this once more in the week with rest days in between each day of training.

Sunday: go for a 3 mile (5k) continuous run and make a note of your time. Divide by 2 for average mile speed.

Week 3: Tuesday: Run for 30 mins. Repeat again once more this week with rest days in between each day of training.

Sunday: run continuously 40 mins and record your time and average mile speed.

Week 4:Tuesday: Run for 30 mins. Take a rest day. Run for 40 mins.

Sunday: run continuously for 3 miles. Record your time and divide by 3 for average mile speed.

Weeks 1 to 4 Hints

The first four weeks of this programme are designed to improve your level of fitness so that you can run three miles at a steady pace.

Use a combination of walking and running if you need to during the midweek sessions of weeks 1 and 2. The key is continuous movement and keeping your heart rate and breathing raised but steady.

When it comes to the long Sunday runs, it’s important that you can run the distance continuously. If you can’t run the two miles at the end of week 2, it’s a good idea to repeat weeks 1 and 2 before continuing to weeks 3 and 4.

Recording your mileage times is a good way to monitor your progress, and a good psychological boost as the times improve. However, don’t be disappointed if – after week 4 – the mile times increase a little as you start to run longer distances.

Week 5: Tuesday: Run for 30 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 40 mins. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday: run continuously for 50 minutes and record your time and average mile speed at the end, if known.

Week 6: Tuesday: Run for 30 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 50 mins. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday:  run continuously for 5 miles. Record your time and average mile speed at the end, if known.

Week 7: Tuesday: Run for 40 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 45 mins. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday:  run continuously for 60 mins. Record your mileage and average mile speed if known.

Week 8:  Tuesday: Run for 40 mins Have a rest day. Run for 30 mins. Have a couple of rest days before the Sunday run.

Sunday: run for 6 miles (10k) and record your mileage/speed if known.

Weeks 5 to 8 Hints

The aim of weeks 5 to 8 is to build up your continuous running and extend your distance. Your body also needs to get used to a regular running regime if it is to ultimately manage a 10 mile run.

During the midweek runs feel free to start more gently, but try to improve the pace when you can, and increase the effort you put in. Tuesday sessions are useful as recovery from Sunday’s long run but the 2nd run of the week is a better day to try experimenting with speed, pace and stride.

Do your long runs at an even pace, focusing on technique and rhythm, and don’t start too fast. It is better to start at a slightly reduced level of effort and put in a stronger last mile than to start at a higher level of effort and having to walk for the final mile!

Week 9: Tuesday: Run for 40 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 60 mins. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday:  run continuously for 60 mins. Record your mileage/speed if known.

Week 10: Tuesday: Run for 45 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 5 miles. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday:  run continuously for 8 miles. Record your time/speed if known.

Week 11: Tuesday: Run for 40 mins. Have a rest day. Run for 60 mins. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

Sunday:  run continuously for 90 mins. Record your mileage/speed if known.

Week 12 – Race Week!: Tuesday: Run for 40 mins. Have a rest day. Run for an easy 5 miles. Have a rest day or two before the Sunday run.

RACE DAY:  run for 10 miles. Good luck!

Weeks 9 to 12 Hints

You now need to increase your distances to eight miles or more fairly quickly. You don’t necessarily need to run a full 10 miles in training before the race, so don’t be disappointed if you can’t get over 8 or 9  miles in training. Hopefully on the day your race enthusiasm, excitement and spectator support will be you through those final challenging miles!

Week 12 is a “taper week”, prior to the race, and therefore the final run on Thursday/Friday should be gentle steady one to prepare the body for the race. Fight all temptation to go further or faster than recommended.A few things to remember from the start:

  • Allow rest days (days when you don’t run) between the runs for your body to recover and adapt.
  • If/when you have to walk, always do so purposefully and use the time as a good stretching opportunity.
  • Don’t be afraid to repeat a week, if you are feel unprepared for the next part, or to drop back a week if you find the next stage too demanding at first. Everyone is different and bodies adapt at different rates.
  • Wear proper running shoes as these will provide shock-absorption, support, protection, comfort and an efficient     exchange of energy from the ground. Seek advice from a specialist running shop for shoe advice, gait analysis and information.
  • Believe in yourself!

To maintain this new level of fitness, try to do two 40-50 min (or 6-8 mile) runs every week plus a longer run on Sundays. You are now ready to prepare for a half-marathon!